Aeonium kiwi Growing and Plant Care Guide

  • By: admin
  • Date: September 6, 2022
  • Time to read: 6 min.
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Plant Care Tips Creative
Plant Care Tips Creative

Aeonium kiwi is a succulent, and one of the most popular plants in the world. They are easy to grow and care for which makes them an excellent plant for beginners or people with busy schedules.

Aeonium kiwi Care & Maintenance:

Aeonium kiwi is a succulent, and one of the most popular plants in the world. They are easy to grow and care for which makes them an excellent plant for beginners or people with busy schedules.

Water: Aeonium kiwi requires very little water. In fact, they can get by with as little as once a month, but the best method is to give them water about once or twice a week. It’s best to soak them in water overnight so they are able to take up as much of it as possible.

Sunlight:

Partial sun is Aeonium kiwi’s ideal location because too much direct sunlight can cause Aeonium kiwi to lose some of its colors.

Temperature: Aeonium kiwi requires average warmth for proper growth and development. Ideal temperature range between 70°F – 85°F (21°C – 29°C) during the day and at night 60°F – 65°F (16°C-18°C). Never place plants directly in front of air conditioning or heating vents.

Humidity:

The yellow-green rosette shape is Aeonium 'Kiwi' or Kiwi Aeonium. Gorgeous yellow-green rosette shape, Aeonium 'Kiwi' or Kiwi Aeonium. This succulent has beautiful florets feature and shade of color from bright yellow to darker green with pink edge. Aeonium kiwi stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Average humidity is fine for Aeonium kiwi. If the relative humidity drops below 50% then you may need to mist your plant 1-2 times a day or run a humidifier near it, but make sure that the soil never becomes soggy and water puddled. Never allow water to accumulate in saucers beneath pots as this can lead to root rot.

Pruning & Shaping: Aeonium kiwi do not require pruning to grow well, but if you want a neater-looking plant you may want to pinch off any dead spots. As far as shaping goes, if you have an Aeonium kiwi plant that has grown too tall simply cut all of the branches off at ground level and new ones will grow.

Repotting:

Aeonium kiwi is slow growers, but you should repot them every 2-3 years into a pot that is 1 size larger to provide fresh soil. During the winter months reduce watering slightly. Use a container with drainage holes to prevent roots from rotting.

Fertilizer: During the growing season enrich the soil with a controlled release fertilizer or an organic liquid fertilizer to promote rapid growth. You can also use bone meal and/or blood meal as organic alternatives. Stop fertilizing in late fall and resume fertilizing after mid-March when active growth resumes.

Pests & Diseases:

Aeoniumiwi rarely has problems with pests and diseases, but you may encounter scale or mealy bugs. Try to treat small infestations with an insecticide that is labeled for that particular pest. If the problem persists then try moving the plant to a location away from direct sunlight which will help kill off any remaining pests.

Aeonium kiwi is slow growers, but you should repot them every 2-3 years into a pot that is 1 size larger to provide fresh soil. During the winter months reduce watering slightly. Use a container with drainage holes to prevent roots from rotting. Please note: This guide is for Aeonium arboretum cv., not Aeonium haworthii.

Aeonium kiwi Pruning Requirements:

1. Remove the offsets (pups) that grow around the base of Aeonium kiwi

2. Cut off diseased or dying leaves and stems

3. Pinch out growing tips to promote lateral growth

4. Remove dead leaves

5. If your plant is in a container cut back on watering and only water every 2-3 weeks 6. Clean up dropped leaves and other debris to promote better health

Remember: It’s best not to prune tropical plants like Aeonium kiwi when the temperature is below 50°F/10°C because they can easily get damaged by cold temperatures during the winter when you prune them in fall/early spring, but if they’re kept indoors this shouldn’t be a problem.

Temperature Control

Ideal temperature range between 70°F – 85°F (21°C – 29°C) during the day and at night 60°F – 65°F (16°C-18°C). Never place plants directly in front of air conditioning or heating vents because extreme temperatures can cause leaf drops. If you keep your Aeonium kiwi indoors this shouldn’t be an issue though.

Watering

Water only when the top 2 inches of soil are dry, but make sure that water drains through the bottom hole of your pot before you water again. Water sparingly in winter, but don’t let them dry out completely or they may drop their leaves.

Fertilizer

During the growing season enrich the soil with a controlled release fertilizer or an organic liquid fertilizer to promote rapid growth. You can also use bone meal and/or blood meal as organic alternatives. Stop fertilizing in late fall and resume fertilizing after mid-March when active growth resumes.

Container Growing

Beautiful Aeonium succulent flower in yellow and green colors closuep. Beautiful petals look like rose Beautiful Aeonium succulent flower in yellow and green colors closuep. Beautiful petals look like rose Aeonium kiwi stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

If you’re growing Aeonium kiwi in a container this should be done every 3-4 years. In the fall repot your plant into a pot that is 1 size larger with fresh soil and move it to a location away from direct sunlight. This will allow any pests or diseases that may be affecting the plant to die off so they won’t be able to harm it in its weakened state.

Pests

Aeonium kiwi rarely has problems with pests and diseases, but you may encounter scale or mealy bugs. Try to treat small infestations with an insecticide that is labeled for that particular pest. If the problem persists then try moving the plant to a location away from direct sunlight which will help kill off any remaining pests.

Drought Tolerant

Aeonium Kiwi is extremely drought tolerant and can handle long periods of little to no water without showing too much damage. In fact, it’s even harder than these Aeoniums: Aeonium arboretum cv., Aeonium mobile, and Aeonium haworthii.

Frost Tolerant

Aeonium Kiwi is more cold-hardy than the previously mentioned Aeoniums, but when temperatures drop below 32°F/0°C expect leaf tip damage or browning. At temperatures between 28°F – 34°F (-2°C – 1°C) be sure to move your plant indoors so they don’t freeze to death. This isn’t a tropical plant so if you keep them indoors this shouldn’t be a problem.

Cold Tolerant

In general Aeonium kiwi are cold-tolerant, but for those of you living in colder areas of the world who want to grow them outside you should remember that they’re native to forested areas of the Canary Islands and Southwestern Spain where temperatures stay between 14°F – 20°F (-10°C – -6°C) all year long.

So if you live in a place with extended periods of temperatures below 26°F (-3°C), then protect your plants from frost by moving them indoors before it gets cold or planting palms around your Aeoniums to give them some protection from cold winter winds.

Growth Rate

When they’re young Aeonium kiwi are slow-growing, but once they reach maturity it becomes more common for them to grow an inch or so a year. Just imagine how big your plant will be in about 10 years!

While some will only grow 12 – 24 inches (30 – 61 cm), others might get as tall as 3 feet (90 cm). So enjoy the show because the flowers only appear on mature plants and you won’t see any blooms until your plant is at least 5-6 years old.

Propagation

Aeonium kiwi can be propagated through the division of their parent plant. If you live in an area where temperatures stay above 40°F/5°C all winter long, then you can put your plant outside for the summer.

If not, keep it indoors during the summer and move it outside in September (if you live in a place where temperatures stay above 50°F/10°C) or October (if you live in a place where temperatures stay below 60°F/15°C). Keep its environment moist until new roots appear which shouldn’t take more than one to two weeks. Once this happens let your plant dry out before watering again.

When to Repot

Repot Aeonium kiwi every 2 – 3 years when they’re young, but once they reach maturity repot them every 7 – 9 years.

It’s not uncommon for these plants to only be 12 – 24 inches (30 – 61 cm) tall, but some may get up to 3 feet (90 cm). So it shouldn’t be too difficult to find a pot that’s the right size for your Aeonium. If you repot yours when it gets root-bound or if its leaves turn yellow or brown then try using my method which is simply covering their soil with pumice allowing for better aeration and drainage.

Summary

Once you know how easy they are to grow, have learned about their pests & diseases, discovered what makes them so cold hardy, gained insight into how to propagate them, gained insight into their growth rate, understand when they need repotting, realize when they begin blooming, found out where to place them, learned how to protect them from frost, and know when they’re safe to put outside, then you’ll finally understand why Aeonium kiwi is one of the best houseplants for beginners!

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